Octree Observer

  • Lost devices are a leading cause of data breaches

    by : Octree

    For the financial sector lost or stolen mobile devices were the leading cause of data breaches over the last decade.

    An interesting article from SC Magazine that once again highlights the potential data loss through unsecured mobile devices, and particularly within financial services.

    Phishing scams and ransomware attacks may grab the headlines, but for the financial sector lost or stolen mobile devices were the leading cause of data breaches over the last decade.

    A Bitglass report found 25.3 percent of data breaches that have occurred since 2006 were due to malicious actors getting their hands on a corporate mobile device. This is well above the 19.2 percent of breaches that were caused by hacking, the 14.1 percent due to unintended disclosures and the 13.1 percent of incidents caused by company insiders.

    The report does not disclose how many devices are lost, nor how many of those might end up in the hands of a malicious actor, but the fact that many employees have access to key corporate information means any loss can be catastrophic.

  • Safer Internet Day 2016

    by : Octree

    This year’s theme is very clear, and it’s all about you: "Play your part for a better internet!"

    My thanks to the guys at Sophos for this gem.

    Yesterday was Safer Internet Day (9.2.2016), #SID2016.

    This year’s theme is very clear, and it’s all about you: “Play your part for a better internet!”

    In other words, it’s not about how to use technology to protect yourself; it’s not about what your ISP should do to keep you safe; it’s not about how everyone else can keep you safe, although all those things are both important and useful.

    This year, more than ever, Safer Internet Day is about asking not what the internet can do for you, but what you can do for the internet.

    ALTRUISM BEGINS AT HOME

    But that doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t look out for yourself.

    In fact, the great thing about computer security is that by looking out for yourself, you help everyone else at the same time.

    It’s true the other way around, too: if you behave carelessly online, you may put your friends, your family, and even complete strangers directly into the firing line of cyber-crooks.

    For example, if you get infected by ransomware, the crooks will hold your data hostage, and you may end up paying them £200 to get the data back, which makes it sound as though malware prevention is all about saving yourself.

    But most malware infections aren’t ransomware.

    Most malware is some sort of bot or zombie: a malicious program used by crooks so they can send commands to your computer from the other side of the world. (Bot is short for “robot,” because your computer ends up blindly following orders from someone else.)

    The crooks will almost certainly dig around on your computer to find out if you have anything interesting for them to steal, such as passwords or account details, which clearly puts you at direct risk.

    But your home computer is probably full of information about other people, too: pictures, email addresses, phone numbers, perhaps even information from work about customers or colleagues.

    Even if the crooks who infected your computer aren’t interested in all that information for future cybercrimes of their own, it has value to them because they can sell it on to other crooks.

    Additionally, once cybercriminals have got what they want from your hard disk, they will turn outwards, using your computer as a springboard to attack other people.
  • Bring Your Own Disaster as UK firms see rising mobile breaches

    by : Octree

    BT Study highlights the threats to businesses with unmanaged mobile devices

    A study from BT reveals that almost half of UK firms (41 percent) suffered a mobile security breach over the last year, with another fifth reporting as many as four incidents in the same time-frame.

    The research reveals that UK businesses are still not taking sufficient security measures to protect themselves from mobile threats – such as lost and stolen devices or mobile malware infections - and this all comes despite the same study revealing that 95 percent of UK organisations now allow their employees to use a BYOD (Bring Your Own) or COPE (Corporately Owned Personally-Enabled) device.

    Some of the findings on mobile security make for shocking reading; just over a third (35 percent) of IT decision makers said that they had a BYOD policy – which is seen by many as the first step in enterprise mobility management - while only 15 percent said that they felt confident they had sufficient resources to prevent a mobile security breach.

  • Bring Your Own Disaster as UK firms see rising mobile breaches

    by : Octree

    BT Study highlights the threats to businesses with unmanaged mobile devices

    A study from BT reveals that almost half of UK firms (41 percent) suffered a mobile security breach over the last year, with another fifth reporting as many as four incidents in the same time-frame.

    The research reveals that UK businesses are still not taking sufficient security measures to protect themselves from mobile threats – such as lost and stolen devices or mobile malware infections - and this all comes despite the same study revealing that 95 percent of UK organisations now allow their employees to use a BYOD (Bring Your Own) or COPE (Corporately Owned Personally-Enabled) device.

    Some of the findings on mobile security make for shocking reading; just over a third (35 percent) of IT decision makers said that they had a BYOD policy – which is seen by many as the first step in enterprise mobility management - while only 15 percent said that they felt confident they had sufficient resources to prevent a mobile security breach.

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